European Suicide, Spiritual and Physical

One Follows the Other

We’ve already witnessed the spiritual demise of Europe. Can its physical demise be far behind?

 

John Stonestreet

In early May, Brussels Airport finally re-opened after being closed for nearly six weeks, following the March terrorist attack that killed sixteen people.

While it will not be back at full capacity until mid-June, the Belgian government sees the re-opening as part of their effort to regain some sense of normalcy after the attacks.

Another part of their efforts is figuring out how to deal with its restive and disgruntled Muslim minority, especially in places like the now-infamous Brussels suburb of Molenbeek. This tiny municipality, measuring less than 2.5 square miles, not only produced the March 22nd attackers, it’s also the reason Belgium produces proportionately more ISIS fighters than any other European country.

In recent remarks before the European Parliament, Koen Geens, Belgium’s Minister of Justice, told parliamentarians that “In Europe, very shortly we’re going to have more practicing Muslims than practicing Christians . . . That is not because there are too many Muslims, it is because Christians are generally less practicing.”

Not surprisingly, people, and not just Muslims, took offense at his comments. Belgium’s Interior Minister said that Geens was “making an enemy of Islam” and insisted that “the overwhelming majority of [Belgian Muslims] share our values.”

Lost in the furor over Geen’s comments was the fact that he was talking primarily about secularism and the decline of Christian practice, and values.

Also lost in this conversation over Belgium’s future, Islam and its jettisoned Christian heritage, is that the nation has turned euthanasia into a fundamental right. As PBS put it, and everyone already knows, Belgium has “the world’s most liberal euthanasia laws.” Physician-assisted suicide there isn’t limited to the terminally-ill – people with psychiatric illnesses or even children can also be euthanized.

As a member of Belgium’s Euthanasia Control and Evaluation Commission told PBS, at the heart of the law is “a respect to individual autonomy.” Thus rather than being limited to the terminally ill, the dark practice is available to anyone who sees his or her condition as “hopeless.”

And that includes, as we’ve previously told BreakPoint listeners, children as young as twelve. All that’s needed is the approval of two doctors, three in the case of psychiatric patients.

By all accounts, Belgium’s law, which goes against everything Christianity teaches about the sanctity and dignity of human life, enjoys wide support. While Geens’ party, the Christian Democrats, has opposed Belgium’s euthanasia regime, their view is a minority one.

The majority view of Belgian elites not only sees euthanasia as an indispensable part of respecting human autonomy, it has laughably convinced itself that the “overwhelming majority” of Belgian Muslims share these secularist values that made euthanizing children not only conceivable but the law.

Now while we’ve singled out Belgium, it’s by no means unique. In fact, it wasn’t even the first country to legalize euthanasia. That dubious distinction belongs to the Netherlands. It’s also legal in Luxemburg and Switzerland. So-called “right to die” advocates expect other western European nations to follow over the next decade.

In light of this, it’s hard to avoid the sense that Europe is committing suicide on multiple levels: first it committed spiritual suicide, turning its back on its Christian heritage. And once this happened, physical suicide wasn’t far behind.

And now, the de-Christianized Europeans find themselves ill-prepared to respond to what’s going on in places like Molenbeek. Not only that, but as they try to figure it out, they miss the obvious—like if you want your nation to survive, legalizing suicide is not only immoral, it’s, shall we say, counter-productive.

Or as Chuck would say, that’s what happens when you saw off the branch that you’re sitting on.

 

Further Reading and Information

European Suicide, Spiritual and Physical: One Follows the Other

As John points out, there’s a direct correlation between a country’s rejection of spiritual foundations and their demise through the rise of physical suicide. With the decision to create liberal euthanasia legislation, Belgium and other European countries are experiencing the consequences of the rejection of the Christian view of the sacredness of all life. For further information, check out the resources linked below.

Resources

Euthanasia and the Slippery Slope: You Can’t Kill Just One
Eric Metaxas | BreakPoint.org | February 3, 2016

From Suicide to Euthanasia: Europe’s Sinister Slide . . . and Ours?
Eric Metaxas | BreakPoint.org | August 27, 2015

The right to die in Belgium: An inside look at the world’s most liberal euthanasia law
PBSnewshour.com | October 16, 2014

Belgium: The Christian Democrats call for a review of euthanasia legislation
Genethique.org | February 3, 2016

Available at the online bookstore

Life’s Worth: The Case Against Assisted Suicide
Arthur J. Dyck, Dennis P. Hollinger, Francis J. Beckwith | Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company | November 2002


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