BreakPoint: The Assisted Suicide Freight Train Hits the Brakes

Pro-Life Victories

A funny thing happened on the way to our supposed brave new world of assisted suicide. I’ll tell you about it, next on BreakPoint.

Proponents of assisted suicide would have us believe that legalized killing is an unstoppable freight train and that those who oppose it are going to get run over. And no wonder. Last year Colorado and the District of Columbia legalized it, while California enacted a bill that had been passed in 2015. They joined Oregon, Vermont, Washington, and Montana where this great evil is now legal.

That’s why I’m very pleased to tell you that reports of the demise of a culture of life have been, to borrow a phrase, greatly exaggerated. We’re starting to win again. No, this doesn’t mean we can relax, but it’s really good news—and frankly, we could use some.

Bills to legalize euthanasia “have done very poorly” in 2017, Rita Marker, executive director of the Patients Rights Council, told Baptist Press. “That has been a shock to those who are in favor of it because they thought that all of [a] sudden the dam had burst and everything would happen for them.”

So far, that has not happened. Bills to advance the idea that some lives aren’t worth living have gone down to defeat in Indiana, Mississippi, New Mexico and Tennessee. Also in New Mexico, the state senate voted 22-20 against a bill to legalize assisted suicide for people expected to die within six months. It was a bipartisan vote, with 7 Democrats joining 15 Republicans.

Similar bills stalled in Hawaii, Maryland, Utah, and Wyoming, Marker said, although it’s always possible they could be brought back. In Hawaii, a House of Representatives committee unanimously decided not to advance a proposal allowing physicians to prescribe lethal drugs on the same day a patient is diagnosed as terminally ill.

Eva Andrade of the Hawaii Family Forum said that Hawaiians should “say a prayer of thanksgiving” while remaining vigilant—because when it comes to assisted suicide bills, death is never final. “Although this may seem like the battle is over, please be advised that the battle is not over until the last day of session,” Andrade said. “And even then, the bill is still alive for next session. Even now, proponents are most likely regrouping.”

Dauneen Dolce, executive director of the Right to Life Committee of New Mexico, told the American Family Association that assisted suicide legislation likely will be introduced next year. Therefore, she said, those opposing the culture of death must remain “actively involved in some way,” by “educating yourself, or giving support to the organizations that are educating others, or [being] involved in the political arena. If you don’t do that,” she added, “you are handing over our state [and] our laws, and the culture of death will come to us—and that’ll be from apathy.”

The job is immense. According to a 2016 survey by LifeWay Research, 67 percent of Americans say it is morally acceptable for terminally ill patients to ask their physicians to help them end their lives. We must not only work to change—or block—laws in the political and legislative realms. We must also work—and pray—to change hearts and minds in our neighborhoods, in our social and work circles, and across society.

Apparently most Americans see pain and suffering as the ultimate evil and personal autonomy as the highest good. What I can only call this “sub-Christian worldview” completely misses the truth that God can and often does use the things we’d rather avoid in our lives—even at the end of life—to draw us closer to Himself.

Remember, when it comes to assisted suicide, apathy is deadly. So let’s educate our fellow Americans about the beauty and dignity of life, from the moment of conception to the moment of natural death. Remember as well: “If we live, we live for the Lord; and if we die, we die for the Lord. So, whether we live or die, we belong to the Lord.”

Come to BreakPoint.org for resources on the evil of assisted suicide.

Further Reading and Information

The Assisted Suicide Freight Train Hits the Brakes: Pro-Life Victories

As Eric points out, there is good news for those who value life and recognize its worth at every stage. Check out the links below for further information on the setbacks to the assisted suicide freight train.

 

Find a BreakPoint radio station in your area–Click here.

Resources

Assisted suicide bills faring poorly in 2017
  • David Roach | Baptist Press | March 27, 2017
Always Care, Never Kill
  • Ryan T. Anderson | Heritage Foundation | March 24, 2015
The Art of Dying: Living Fully into the Life to Come
  • Rob Moll | IVP Books | June 2010

  • Whitney

    Shouldn’t this choice belong to the patient and their family? Ultimately, it is the patient who will have to answer to god for their suicide, and it it the patient who will suffer the consequences. I don’t see pain and suffering as the ultimate evil, but I’m not going to lie and say I’d be super grateful to be alive as a dependant quadriplegic. Perhaps the methods used to bring people closer to god ought to be between god and that person, maybe others don’t see themselves as living when they have no personal autonomy.

    • gladys1071

      i Agree with what you have to say. The fact that so many Christians harp about assisted suicide so much tells me they are really afraid of death and want to avoid it at all costs and prolong life as long as possible. I agree its not a one size fits all and you are right, assisted suicide should be between the person their family and God. As a Christian myself i don’t understand this opposition to assisted suicide so much, and the lack of compassion and empathy for the suffering person too, yet we are suppose to be compassionate and loving to our neighbor, not convince them that prolonged suffering is good or God’s will, we cannot be the judge of that.

      • Ann Morgan

        Gladys, the main problem I see with assisted suicide, is that the government has repeatedly proven that it CANNOT abide by limits. In a sane world, with a sane government, I would advocated assisted suicide. As it is, if it is allowed, I fear it won’t be too long before ‘assisted’ becomes ‘mandatory’.

  • Dave

    Years ago my Father-in-law died of ALS. He would have opted for assisted suicide if he could have. But those last 3 years of his life softened his heart and he came to the Lord a few months before he died. I am so glad I had the opportunity to share the gospel with him and that he did not go into a Christless eternity.

  • Linda

    It is hard to see a loved one in pain, although there are a lot more ways to help with that pain than there used to be, but the bigger issue is the slippery slope. I work with special needs children–some of whom are quadraplegics, and they are the most fun kids! What is happening in Europe makes it VERY clear that, if assisted suicide becomes law, it will move to not suicide but murder of those whose life is deemed “not worth living” and/or those who are a financial burden.
    A recent episode of Blue Bloods included a plot line of a husband smothering his terminally ill wife, and Detective Reagan sympathizing with him. I wish the Colson Center had a way to “take action” by just clicking on a link and sending a letter to not just legislators but TV networks and producers.