The Point: A Victory for Creative Professionals

A Christian photographer in Wisconsin refuses to photograph gay “weddings.” You know where this is going . . . or do you?

According to the Alliance Defending Freedom, Amy Lawson “has a passion to use her talents in photography and blogging to promote the beauty of God’s design for marriage and the sanctity of life.”

But a Madison, Wisconsin ordinance forced her out of the wedding biz because it would have compelled her to photograph gay weddings and even praise them on her blog!

The Alliance Defending Freedom took her case . . . and won! A judge ruled that because she doesn’t operate a store front business, the ordinance does not apply. So she’s free to use her God-given artistic talents according to her beliefs.

ADF is taking on similar cases across the country. If you are a creative professional . . . photographer, musician, artist of any kind, please, check out the Alliance Defending Freedom at ADFlegal.org. And on Twitter, follow the case of cake maker Jack Phillips at #justiceforJack.

 

Resources


Comment Policy: Commenters are welcome to argue all points of view, but they are asked to do it civilly and respectfully. Comments that call names, insult other people or groups, use profanity or obscenity, repeat the same points over and over, or make personal remarks about other commenters will be deleted. After multiple infractions, commenters may be banned.

  • Ynot NOW

    I see, so the Court ruled that if she had a store-front business, Amy Lawson would lose this right that she has for an on-line business? That’s a pretty “thin” victory!

  • Phoenix1977

    “So she’s free to use her God-given artistic talents according to her beliefs.”
    Only until the Supreme Court rules against Jack Phillips. So her “victory” might be short lived.

  • Tyler

    I honestly think that in order for these victories to carry more weight, the ADF and similar entities who do this kind of work need to start highlighting other victories for non-Christian freedom of religious expression cases. It would erode the impression that not only they, but American Christians in general, only care about freedom of expression when it serves the church’s goals. Does the ADF take cases for, let’s say, Hindu clients who have been discriminated against?