Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission: What’s at Stake, and What You Can Do (Part 1)

On December 5, the U. S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission.

Today on the BreakPoint podcast we present a discussion about this monumental case that John Stonestreet had with the Alliance Defending Freedom’s Kristin Waggoner (who is representing cake artist Jack Phillips before the Court) and Ryan T. Anderson of the Heritage Foundation.

John, Kristin, and Ryan talk about the specifics of the case, its significance, and what we can do to support Jack Phillips.

Editor’s note: The audio is taken from a webinar that the Colson Center hosted right after the Court agreed to hear the case. If the audio sounds a little off to you, that’s the reason why.


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  • Zarm

    A good discussion. The list of other cakes that he has turned down was especially illuminating, as inconsistency-of-principle-application is one of the chief arguments frequently leveled against bakers in these cases.

  • Roome

    The case Kristin Waggoner makes for the violation of Jack’s religious freedom is strong, but the darkness of those who oppose him and the force they apply through multiple mediums is immense. How can I as an individual be more effective in applying the force of truth beyond writing editorials and talking to my neighbors? The greatest force I can apply is in prayer, but I want to do something in this physical world as well. Anyone out there interested in forming a prayer chain that links our prayers to practical actions such as forming demonstrations, printing calls to action, or putting together seminars or debates on the issue. Wow, I’d love to see a debate on this issue in Minnesota, especially if it was bathed in prayer.